Erica vagans f. vagans : flowers various shades of pink (not white)

Flower colours are indicated using the colours given in The Heather Society's colour chart, with a code of the colour; thus, H9 is the code for the colour called beetroot.

Flowering periods are indicated by Roman numerals from I to XII (each equivalent to a month); thus, for example, IX-XII means September to December (in northern hemisphere).


‘Birch Glow’

Deep bright rose-pink (H7) flowers, VIII–XI; dark green foliage; height 26–30cm; spread 46–60cm. Outstanding. Blooms two weeks later than others of similar colour. Found by Walter Ingwersen (Birch Farm Nursery, East Grinstead, West Sussex).

‘Carnea’

Shell-pink (H16) flowers, VIII–IX; mid-green foliage; vigorous bushy habit; height 31–45cm; spread 61–75cm. A nineteenth-century selection.

‘Chittendenii’

Pink flowers, VIII–X; dark green foliage; slow-growing ; height 31–45cm; spread 61–75cm.

Introduced by 1934.

Named after F. J. Chittenden (1873-1950), former editor of the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, and Director of the Society's Gardens, Wisley, Surrey.

‘Diana Hornibrook’

Deep rose-pink (H7) flowers, VIII–X; dark green foliage; height 21–25cm; spread 31–45cm. Outstanding.

Found by Murray Hornibrook (best-known for his books about dwarf and slow-growing conifers); introduced in Britain by 1946.

Named after the daughter of Murray Hornibrook.

‘Fiddlestone’

Deep cerise (H6) flowers, VIII–X; mid-green foliage; height 26–30cm; spread 46–60cm. Outstanding. Named after the finder's house in the Wirral, Cheshire.

‘George Underwood’

Pink (H8) flowers, VIII–X; mid-green foliage; height 21–25cm; spread 46–60cm. Attractive plant, named after the owner of the famous heather nursery in Surrey.

‘Grandiflora’

Pale shell-pink (H16) flowers, VIII–X, in long cylindrical spikes; mid-green foliage; open habit, very vigorous; height 46–60cm; spread 61–75cm.

Listed as early as 1867 by James Smith (Darley Dale, Derbyshire, England) as E. multiflora grandiflora.

Named from Latin grandiflorus = large-flowered.

‘Highway One’

Flowers light pink (lavender pink); VIII-IX; foliage fairly dark green; very vigorous, erect, to 25cm across.

Selected chance seeding; found on Highway One in Fort Bragg, California, USA. Registered on 5 December 2003 by Homer C. Ferguson.

‘Holden Pink’

Pale shell-pink (H16) flowers, VIII–X; mid-green foliage; height 21–25cm; spread 46–60cm. Introduced by Holden Clough Nursery (Clitheroe, Lancashire).

‘Hookstone Rose’

Deep pink (H8) flowers, VII–X, very abundant; dark green foliage; height 31–45cm; spread 61–75cm. Flower colour is deeper than 'St Keverne' but paler than 'Mrs D. F. Maxwell'.

Chance seedling, most likely from 'Mrs. D.F. Maxwell'; found by G. Underwood at Hookstone Green Nursery (West End, Woking, Surrey, England); introduced by Underwood Bros, about 1946.

Named after the Underwoods' nursery, and the flower colour.

‘Ida M. Britten’

Deep lilac flowers, VII–XI, blooms for a long time; mid-green foliage; vigorous; height 31–45cm; spread 61–75cm.

Seedling; found by Mrs Britten at Newstead Abbey Park, Nottingham, England, in 1971; introduced by 1973.

Named after the finder.

‘J. C. Fletcher’

Deep shell-pink (H16) flowers, VIII–X; dark green foliage; height 31–45cm; spread 46–60cm. Named after a nursery foreman at R. V. Roger Ltd., Pickering, North Yorkshire.

‘Joan Graham’

Flowers white to lilac (H4) with red /crimson petal edges turning brown; foliage green; habit  upright, large,self-branching. Chance seeding; raised by M. Nicholson; found in a tray of seedlings set from capsules from 'Mrs D. F. Maxwell'; the other parent was possibly 'Lyonesse'. Outgrew the other 50 seedlings and was covered in flowers; bloomed for first time in September 2000.
Named after Mrs Nicholson (her maiden name). Registered on 1 February 2001 by Mr M. Nicholson.

‘Keira’

Deep rose-pink (H7) flowers, VIII–X; dark green foliage. Deliberately bred seedling raised by Kurt Kramer (Edewecht, Germany).

Selected and introduced by Forest Edge Nurseries.

Named by Miss Samantha Cordwell.

® E.2007.02 registered 10 January 2007 by David Edge, Forest Edge Nurseries, Woodlands, Wimborne, Dorset.

‘Lilacina’

Lilac (H4) flowers, VII–IX, early to come into bloom, free-flowering; mid-green foliage; height 21–25cm; spread 46–60cm.

Introduced by 1964.

Named after the Latin lilacinus = lilac.

‘Miss Waterer’

Deep shell-pink (H16) flowers, VIII–IX; mid-green foliage; height 31–45cm; spread 46–60cm.

Wild-collected; found on The Lizard, Cornwall, England, by Miss M. B. G. Waterer (Eden Valley, Ludgvan, Cornwall) about 1917; introduced by Slieve Donard Nursery (Newcastle, County Down, Northern Ireland) about 1934.

Named after the finder, Martha Betha Gertrude Waterer (1822-1974; Yearbook of The Heather Society 3 (3): 46-53 (1985)).

‘Mrs D. F. Maxwell’

Deep rose-pink (H6/H7)flowers, VIII–X; dark green foliage; height 26–30cm; spread 31–45cm. Outstanding. Found by Mrs Maxwell on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall, whilst on her honeymoon.

‘Mrs Donaldson’

Pale rose-pink (H7) flowers, VII–IX; mid-green foliage; height 26–30cm; spread 46–60cm. One of the earliest Cornish heaths to bloom.

‘Pallida’

Lilac (H4) flowers, loose in habit, VII–X; bright green foliage; vigorous; height 26–30cm; spread 46–60cm. Comes into bloom early.

Plants under this name were cultivated as early as 1825; the present clone is unlikely to be the same as the one known to Sinclair.

Named from Latin pallidus = pale.

‘Peach Blossom’

Pale pink (H8) flowers, VIII–X; mid-green foliage; height 26–30cm; spread 46–60cm. Very attractive.

Found and introduced by Treseders Nursery (Truro, Cornwall, England) by 1966.

Name is presumably an allusion to the flower colour.

‘Pyrenees Pink’

Deep pink (H8) flowers, VIII–X, fading to white; dark green foliage; forms a compact spreading dome; height 16–20cm; spread 46–60cm.. In dry summers this does not perform well, producing fewer flowers; it also has a rather untidy appearance.

Introduced by G. Underwood & Son (Hookstone Green Nursery, West End, Woking, Surrey, England) in 1936; the origin of this cultivar is not known.

Name presumed to have been acquired because it came from The Pyrenees.

‘Red Delight’

Flowers rose-pink (H7); VII-X; foliage: mid green; habit spreading; height 30cm; spread 50cm after 3 years pruned. The flower colour resembled ‘Birch Glow’ but the flowers are bigger.

Seedling raised by Kurt Kramer in 2003 from an unnamed seedling pollinated by ‘Birch Glow’; selected in 2011.

® E.2012:02  registered on 19 February 2012 by K. Kramer, Edewecht-Süddorf, Germany.

‘Rosea’

Pure pink flowers, VIII–IX; mid-green foliage; vigorous upright habit; height 31–45cm; spread 61–75cm.

‘Rubra’

Lilac-pink (H11) flowers, VIII–X, in long spikes; mid-green foliage; vigorous open habit; height 31–45cm; spread 61–75cm. ('Grandiflora' is sometimes grown under this name.)

Listed by Sinclair in 1825 as Erica vagans var. rubra, and by J. Smith (Monkwood Grove, near Ayr, Scotland) by 1830. Whether any clone so named now is the same as Sinclair's or Smith's is doubtful.

Named from Latin ruber = red.

‘St Keverne’

Clear pink (H8) flowers, VIII–XI; dark green foliage; height 16–20cm; spread 31–45cm. Found on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall, by P. D. Williams.

‘Summertime’

Shell-pink (H16) flowers, VIII–X; mid-green foliage; neat compact habit; height 10–15cm; spread 31–45cm. Recommended.

‘Viridiflora’

Flowers usually replaced by green feathery shoots, very rarely with pale pink (H8) flowers;VIII–X; mid-green foliage; height 26–30cm; spread 46–60cm. An intriguing, attractive curiosity, suitable for flower-arranging, found on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall, by P. D. Williams.

‘Yellow John’

Lilac flowers (H4), VIII–X; bright yellow foliage, acquiring a pink tinge with age; vigorous; height 31–45cm; spread 31–45cm. More vigorous than'Valerie Proudley' and is thought to be more hardy.

Found by J. B. A. Dekker (Mijdrecht, Netherlands) in 1982; introduced by P. G. Zwijnenburg (Boskoop, Netherlands) in 1986.

Named after Jan Dekker, the finder and alluding to the foliage colour.